About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
street in downtown petaluma, california, but it could be anywhere, u.s.a. this is where small businesses live. small businesses that create two out of every three new jobs in the u.s. tonight you're going to meet some of the people behind those businesses and find out how they plan to keep building those businesses. we begin with the housing market, ground zero for the recession. from construction to appliance makers, when it collapsed it took a lot of very good companies down with it. but here's one that has managed to learn how to paint over the rough spots. you can brush it on, you can roll it on, you can get it on your pants. paint. the kelly moore plant in san carlos, california, turns out nearly 40,000 gallons a day. it's one of the largest employee-owned paint operations in the u.s. part of a $13 billion industry domestically. 140 workers in the 15 acre san carlos facility, 1,500 world wide, including 150 retail outlets in seven states. >> we own currently 58% of the stock and the rest of the stock is owned by the moore family. >> mike: you like white? they got it. you like -- the
it on, you can get it on your pants. paint. the kelly moore plant in san carlos, california, turns out nearly 40,000 gallons a day. it's one of the largest employee-owned paint operations in the u.s. part of a $13 billion industry domestically. 140 workers in the 15 acre san carlos facility, 1,500 world wide, including 150 retail outlets in seven states. >> we own currently 58% of the stock and the rest of the stock is owned by the moore family. >> mike: you like white? they got it. you like -- they got that, too. >> still seeing a lot of reds. that teal is slipping into it. teal and turquoise. green still kind of there still. yellows, yellow influence, neutrals are still there. but the teals and the reds and oranges. oranges are just really popular right now, too. >> i started off with. >> mike: steve devoe is chairman and c.e.o. of the 66-year-old company. he does not paint a pretty picture of what they and every other paint manufacturer has been through over the last couple years. what he does do is point out why kelly moore fared better than most. first, history. they have it. star
-production of kqed and the center for investigative reporting. >> in california's fields, things are changing. crops are less plentiful. >> we're seeing two-thirds of a reduction in volume out of our southern growing regions. >> insects are more abundant. >> our temperatures have increased by two to three degrees fahrenheit, and that seems to be enough to keep them from being frozen out during the winter. i did end up losing one field -- probably a quarter of a million dollar hit. >> water, already scarce, is now too salty to sustain crops. >> if you don't have enough quality water to farm, then there's limits to what we can do with genetics. >> coming up -- climate change pushes california growers to new limits.
california, cost an estimated $1 billion a day. netflix is blaming problems at its web service provider, amazon for a server outage that took down its streaming video service on christmas eve and into christmas day. netflix says it worked through the night with engineers at amazon to get the service back up and running. netflix shares rebounded today, rising almost 2%, while amazon shares fell nearly 4%. >> susie: amazon was just one of many stocks in the red today. as we mentioned earlier, stocks were dragged lower by the retail sector after a report showed consumers did not go all out this holiday shopping season. that sent shares of some of the nation's largest retailers lower. macy's fell 1%. upscale retailers coach and saks were hardest hit. walmart and best buy were also modestly lower. volume improved a bit from monday but was still light with many traders still on vacation. no surprise, consumer related stocks were some of the weakest performers in today trading. consumer discretionary and consumer staples each slid about 1%. a similar drop for utilities. a few court decisions o
. welcome to "this week in northern california." tonight we take a look back at
in california reaches the final legal twist as the u.s. supreme court considers whether to take on proposition 8. the first three strikes prisoners are released after the passing of prop 36. the great bay
to reroute to ports in mexico, panama and northern california. a tentative deal was reached late last night after federal mediators joined negotiations. no details yet on the deal, but workers are expected to get new terms that will prevent jobs from being outsourced. >> tom: we saw the influence of apple on any stk inx which includes it. without apple, the dow rallied. but the nasdaq and s&p 500 were weighed down thanks to apple's weakness. the s&p 500 hit its lowest level of the session just after a stronger than expected report on the services sector before 11:00 a.m. eastern time. it bounced into positive territory and closed up 0.2%. volume picked up a little on the big board with 757 million shares. 1.8 billion moved on the nasdaq. the technology sector was the big drag on the broad market. it fell 1.3%. the utility sector saw the best gains, up 1.6%. apple put the brakes on the broad market, selling off on heavier than usual volume. apple fell 6.4%, with the stock closing at a three-week low. there are plenty of trader theories behind the weakness in apple. they include apple not ann
to a court appointed director. is it enough to avoid a federal takeover? california schools are poised for a tidal wave of money, nearly $3 billion over 5 years. to make schools greener. a bleak future for african-american school-aged boys. it's one of several alarming findings of a legislative committee study. >>> plus, a conversation with an educaon
. it is less than 10 years across the country. and california was leading that effort. in the last four years, the state of colorado really became the forefront of this movement, and certainly in the last two and a half years, things have really stabilized. colorado has been extremely thorough in providing a strongly regulated and compliant model that i think many other states are starting to look at in develop their models after. >> tom: to that point, tripp, how limited is your market geographically? >> you're talking about 105,000 patients to probably a million consumers of the product overnight. that will be conservative when you take in the marijuana tourism aspect of it. in effect, the market has grown 10-fold. >> tom: your website says your parent company does not grow or distribute any substance that violates the united states law or the controlled substance act. how do you put this together, colorado state lou allowin al -- allowing for consumption, but the federal law does not. >> they do not actually own anything directly related to the cultivation, manufacturing or distribution of
is pretty strong. i think california has been reasonably strong for us as well. particularly up in the silicon valley area. i think the success of a number of the companies up there is driving the market. and seattle is another pretty wels we-posione employme ba and we've seen good sales up there. >> tom: from the east coast to the west coast with toll brothers chief financial officer martin connor with us. >> susie: investors are trading on headlines, and the head is all about fiscal cliff. yesterday the dow was up 100 points. today down 100 points all because the headlines weren't looking at favorable. >> tom: just very sensitive to any of the rhetoric coming out of washington for the stock market here, susie. in our "market focus," we can see indications of that. from the post-election highs we destda and the selling picked up a little bit as the day wore on today. here is the trade for the s&p 500. the s&p 500 slipped into the red within the first 20 minutes of trading, with the losses growing in the afternoon to end at the lowest level of the session, down 0.8%. trading vol
immigration reform, there's much at stake in california. home to the largest number of undocumented immigrants in the country. for the first time in five decades, the controversial drilling process of hydraulic fracturing better known as fracking will face state regulation. as a busy travel season approaches, tips to help you navigate the not so friendly skies. and the highest tides of the year hit bay area shorelines. giving a glimpse of the future risk posed by rising sea levels. coming up next.
in connecticut and beyond. >> ifill: we talk with california senator dianne feinstein, who hopes to revive a la
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)